Using Salt in Cooking

salt-cooking-keto-diet

When you are on the keto diet, it is encouraged to have enough minerals like salt, magnesium and potassium.

This is because your body flushes out water quicker when you are omitting carbs from your diet, and therefore it’s easier to deplete your mineral reserves.

Salt is the easiest to add to your diet.

Growing up, I always watched cooking shows to learn and the #1 tip recommended by chefs is use salt and pepper properly and more consistently.

With that in mind, I want to go deep on using salt in cooking from a cookbook I bought called Ruhlman’s Twenty.

The reason I love this book is because it teaches you cooking techniques that you can apply to any ingredient. It’s more than recipes.

Here are his recommendations for using salt:

  • Most common problem for dishes – Too much or little salt
  • Kosher salt for everyday use – Not cheapest or iodized
  • Finishing salts for flavor and texture – Maldon sea salt, Himalayan Pink Salt
  • Salt throughout cooking process – This provides balance compared to only at beginning or end
  • Salt meat immediately – Fish is an exception, but this will slow spoilage and season inside and out
  • Cooking pasta/grains/legumes – Okay, not keto, but use 1% salt solution (1 oz. salt – 100 oz. water)
  • Cooking green vegetables – 5% salt solution (50 g salt, 1 L water), and “shock” by adding cooked veggies to ice water to retain bright green color
  • Salt doesn’t dissolve in oil – If you are seasoning a vinaigrette, add salt to water component before adding oil
  • Use salty foods as seasoning – Anchovies, nuts, olives, cheese, bacon, fish sauce
  • Standard brine ratio – 5% salt solution, simmer then let cool completely before submerging meat and adding to fridge, let meat rest after removing from brine (and don’t reuse liquid)

So there you have it.

Everything you’ve ever wanted to know and more about salt!

Use wisely and keep learning, my friends.